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Showing posts from March, 2021

Rebuild MFJ 1622 Apartment Antenna for Ham Radio

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hSOt9KRooek This is post 2575 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to the "North Caroline Prepper" for this excellent rebuilding project. As the author points out, the MFJ-1622 Apartment Antenna can be improved with a few basic changes.  The antenna covers 80 meters through 2 meters by varying the tap on the loading coil and by adding a few more radial wires. Here are some general comments about the rebuilding process: Rebuilding and repairing a Rebuild MFJ 1622 Apartment Antenna for Ham Radio that I had in storage for a while. The Coax is kind of cheep. A better quality coax would get better improvement. Also if you cut a counterpoise for each band instead of rolling and unrolling the one counterpoise It will hear better. In fact, if you cut a few counterpoises for say 40 meters it will really perform well. ----- Thanks for joinin

Using a magnetic loop antenna in a modern building

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLJmg6xeGkE This post 2574 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Radio amateurs living or working in deed-restricted properties face difficult antenna options. Sometimes, a magnetic loop antenna can get you on the air. But as Carl (M0SZT) points out magnetic loop antennas have severe limitations if you operate from a modern, steel-concrete building. Here are some of Carl's observations: I was hoping to get some success making QSO's on HF from my office space using an indoor antenna . The innovation centre I'm based at is s new build and the construction makes it very difficult to get signals in and out using a magnetic loop as the antenna. Here are a pick of essential amateur radio items from my Amazon Associates: Foundation Licence Manual: for Radio Amateurs: https://amzn.to/3kvp9kf ​ Xiegu G90 HF Amateur Radio Transceiver: https:

Clearing Up Some Confusion About End-Fed Wire Antennas

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zF7bDoqkG4 This is post 2573 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Gil from the "RadioPreppers.com" website for this fascinating look at end-fed antennas. Gil does an excellent job of explaining the pros and cons of this popular Amateur Radio antenna. Gil shows how to maximize the performance of end-fed random wires with a variety of UNUNs, including 9:1 and 49:1 transformer values. Here are some comments from Gil: Hoping to clear up some confusion on end-fed wires, half-wave or random and the impedance transformers used with them. You also get a free rant on contests and a quick glimpse of my new Elecraft K1. Check out the Half-Wave End-Fed antenna group on Facebook, by Steve Ellington. Formulas for half-wave wire calculations are 143/f in MHz for meters and 468/f for feet. Feedback would be appreciated especially to correct an

The Eggbeater Antenna

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N9DEoSsgHlE This is post 2572 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Do you need a simple, reliable antenna for LEO (Low Earth Orbit) Amateur Radio Satellites? If this is on you "to do" list, then this video from John (KB2HSH) may answer many of your questions. According to Jerry (K5OE), the Eggbeater Antenna "is an omni-directional antenna using circular polarization to maximize signal capture from low Earth orbiting satellites."  This antenna "is 2 full-wave length loops fed in quadrature." The video lists all of the materials and tools needed to design, build, and test the antenna. Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM). Here are some additional notes from John (KB2HSH): Music in this video Learn more Listen ad-free with YouTube Premium Song Bitter Sweet Symphony (Extended Version) Artist The Verve W

Simple 20m Back Garden DX Antenna

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1mkLN4s6bo This is post 2571 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Now that Solar Cycle 25 is underway, many radio amateurs will resume their search for DX and other rare locations. One of the best early bands for serious DX work is the familiar standby of 20 meters.  That band is open many hours of the day, including some evening and early morning operations. In this video, Peter of "Waters & Stanton" in the UK shows us how to design, make, and use a basic "L" antenna.  The antenna uses only 2 pieces of wire for the antenna--one for the radiating element and the other for a counterpoise. Despite is simplicity, the antenna works well and should give you many hours of enjoyment. Here are some comments from Peter: Here's a simple wire antenna that you can make quickly. It's a sure fire design that will get you onto 20m

Beverage Antenna: Field Installation Techniques

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l91JL2ImEbk This is post 2570 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Steve (VE6WZ) for this excellent guide to designing, building, and installing a field expedient Beverage receiving antenna.   Here are a few comments from Steve: Various methods for construction and installation of a Beverage RX antenna in the field. Described are methods for wire layout, tree clearing, wire support and both feed-point and termination installation using tree supports. Also shown is how the relay boxes for multiple Beverages, and the broadside phasing boxes are deployed in the field. ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).  

80 Meter Half-Square Antenna

How would you like to improve the performance of your 80 meter HF antenna? All you have to do is follow Don Johnson's (N4DJ) suggestions and build a "classic" half-square antenna.  The antenna is bidirectional and exhibits  some gain broadside to the antenna. If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2SBGdPMnH-E This is post 2569 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. If you don't have room for the 80 Meter Half-Square, try building one for 20 or 15 meters.  Either way, this antenna will add some RF "power" to your signal. Here are a few comments from Don: My 80 meter bent half square was probably the best antenna I ever had. I had it broadside to Europe at my Hampton Va QTH, I had it broadside to the Pacific area for one contest at my New Kent location and then installed it again broadside to Europe. Very hard to work Europe off the ends so I took about 5 hours t

How to use a manual antenna tuner

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JYlECCWTbCE This is post 2568 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. An antenna transmatch (i.e. tuner or coupler) is a familiar piece of equipment in many ham shacks.  "Tuners" insure that impedances between antennas and transceivers are matched to allow maximum efficiency. In this video, Michael Martens (KB9VBR) shows us how to properly use an antenna "tuner" to maximize your antenna system.  Michael uses the popular MFJ-949E (I use the same tuner) to demonstrate basic "tuner" concepts. Here are some of Michaels comments: Antenna tuners are a vital, yet slightly misunderstood ham radio station accessory. In this video we talk about what an antenna tuner does and doesn't do, how it works, and how to tune your antenna system with a manual antenna tuner. MFJ-949E Manual Antenna Tuner: https://amzn.to/3980MW4 ​ Rigex

Ham Radio 10 meter ground plane antenna

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aLgFeTpIX4A This is post 2567 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Now that solar cycle 25 is underway, HF propagation should show some improvement over the next few years. This would be a perfect time to build an inexpensive, basic 10 meter ground plane antenna.  Ten meter operations can be quite exciting once propagation supports signals in the 28 MHz Amateur Radio Band. In this video from Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ), we get a thorough step-by-step tutorial on how to design, build, and test a 10 meter ground plane antenna. Even if propagation is weak, you can use 10 meters for local nets and mobile operations. Here are some of Dave's comments: A 10 meter ground plane antenna that can be mounted on a mast or used as a ground mounted vertical antenna. For more information about this antenna: http://www.amateurradio.bz/10-11m_gro... ----- Thanks for jo

3 Easy Multi-Band HF Antennas you can build

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGctGaY0Cbk This is post 2566 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Here's another fascinating presentation by Callum (M0MCX).  In this video, Callum shows us how to convert loops, dipoles, and verticals into multi-band antennas. The modifications are simple and inexpensive. ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

Low Budget 20 Meter Vertical Antenna

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VfhrMqZAlmg This is post 2565 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to VE3BF for this easily-made 20 meter vertical antenna.  Most of the parts for this simple antenna can be found locally or in your ham shack "junk box." Here are some comments from VE3BF: Build an easy and inexpensive portable antenna for 20 meters and other bands. Parts used: 8 foot fence rail for the mast TV antenna roof tripod 1/2 or 3/4 inch diameter galvanized conduit pipe 6 x 9 inch cedar board 4 pipe sadle clamps 2 hose clamps 1 stainless steel 108 inch whip LDG RU-4:1 Unun 75 feet of 14 gauge wire 50 ohm coax Antenna calculator http://www.66pacific.com/calculators/ ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

Cubical Quad Antennas

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BrVgcxVqwng This is post 2564 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Another antenna worth considering is the "classical cubical quad"-- an antenna easily designed and made for both HF and VHF/UHF operations. In this video from Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ), we get the basics of building HF, VHF, and UHF cubical quad antennas.  The video contains useful suggestions for those of us who want to do some experimenting with these fascinating antennas. Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

Build your own L network antenna tuner

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXD9rAOM_o4 This is post 2563 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. One of the most important accessories in your ham shack is the antenna transmatch or "tuner." An antenna tuner is a basic necessity for a variety of antennas, including end-fed random length wires. In this video, Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW) shows us how to build a simple, inexpensive L network tuner for end-fed wire antennas. Here are some comments from Kevin: They're really very simple to build. I over-built this one to make it clear for the video, but you could make it smaller, put it in a nice box with labels and paint. ;-) I did just that in a newer video. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-fuQ... ​ The antenna I had connected for the demo is an external 98 foot end fed wire. ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

2 element wire yagi for 28 MHz

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8bS1QBH8VwQ This is post 2562 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Australian radio amateur Peter Parker (VK3YE) for this wonderfully simple 2 element beam for the 10 meter band. Peter modified the original design of VE7CA for this easy-to-make antenna. Here are some of Peter's comments: A wire yagi is the simplest and cheapest way to build a gain antenna for the higher HF bands. This video is a description of one for 28 MHz. VE7CA article 1: http://www.arrl.org/files/file/Techno... ​ VE7CA article 2: http://www.ve7ca.net/ANT/MYa/VE7CA%20... ​ VE7CA website: http://www.ve7ca.net/index.php ​ PS: If you liked this video please consider supporting Amateur Radio VK3YE by: * Subscribing on YouTube, * Checking my books page at https://books.vk3ye.com​​ ​ to see if any appeal, * Shopping on Amazon via: https://amzn.to/3iiDQXv​​ ​

Emergency 2m Field Expedient Antenna

If you had to build an emergency 2m antenna in the field, could you do it? In this video, KB1HQS uses his imagination to create a workable 2m VHF antenna out of broken hiking poles. It's always a good idea to carry an emergency antenna when you explore the great outdoors with your ham radio gear. Here are some general comments from KB1HQS: In the field you often have to work with what you have on hand. In this video, I build a 2m dipole out of my broken hiking poles. Dipole Calculator: http://www.westmountainradio.com/ante... ​ BNC to Banana Adapter: https://amzn.to/33sfbZN ​ 73, Stuart, KB1HQS ★ FOLLOW ME HERE ★ Website.....................► https://kb1hqs.com/ ​ ARRL Book...............► https://amzn.to/2QIQEcJ ​ Twitter......................► https://twitter.com/kb1hqs ​ Instagram................► https://instagram.com/kb1hqs ​ Website....................► https://kb1hqs.com/ ​ Newsletter...............► https://www.getrevue.co/profile/KB1HQS ​ Flckr.................