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Showing posts from 2020

Homebrew Slinky Ham Radio Antenna

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jo0QB83tdkQ&ab_channel=W5CYF%2FTinkerJohn Amateur Radio operators have used a variety of "experimental" antennas for their home and portable operations.  Among the more curious materials used for HF antennas is the "Slinky Dipole Antenna" based on the popular children's toy. In this video from "Tinker John" (W5CYF), we see how this expandable steel wire helix can be used as an emergency HF antenna. Because of the complex impedances involved, it may be best to use a balanced feeder (450-ohm window line) and a wide-range antenna "tuner" to keep SWR low and efficiency as high as possible. Here are some general comments from W5CYF: A step-by-step look at building a low cost (under $10) dipole antenna. The question is...will it work? Suggested items that may be related to this video: https://www.amazon.com/shop/w5cyftin

7 Ideas For Indoor Antennas

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Many radio amateurs face severe antenna limitations because of limited space or deed restricted housing (HOAs/CC&Rs). Properly designed and built indoor antennas offer a solution to help you stay on the air, be it VHF/UHF or HF bands. Here are seven indoor antenna designs compiled by the DX zone that could help you pursue Amateur Radio without interference from nosey neighbors or deed enforcement committees ( https://www.dxzone.com/7-ideas-for-indoor-antennas/): Indoor Indoor antenna de F6CYV IW5EDI Indoor wire antenna project for 7 Mhz band, basically a bent dipole antenna, design based on a project by F6CYV RockLoop Antenna G3YCC A Compact antenna for 10, 14 & 21 MHz Bands. A multiband portable and indoor antenna suitable for QRP operations based on an original idea by W9SCH that described this small loop in Sprat 60. 5 Band Indoor Magnetic Loop G4IZH A indoor magnetic loop antenna that covers 20 17 15 12 and 10 meters band with a 3 meter lenght of 22 mm copper tube by G4IZH

Random Wire Solution for an "Indoor Shack"

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxDijG9g0dM&ab_channel=stanscoyote This is post 2429 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to "Stancoyote" for this upbeat, inspirational antenna project for radio amateurs  impacted by deed-restrictions on their property (HOA/CC&Rs). A properly designed random wire combined with a UnUn balun and a wide-range "tuner" can often get you on the air when nothing else will. Here are some general comments about the antenna from Stan: If you are antenna challenged and need to keep a low profile, then a small gauge random wire is often the answer. However, if your shack is deep inside your house, how do you avoid RFI when connecting your rig to the end of the antenna? Here's how I handled it. --------------------------- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM)  

Attic Mounted HF Loop Antenna in HOA

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cYd0l-PEPR8&ab_channel=HamRadioConcepts Radio amateurs living in deed-controlled homes, apartments, and condominiums face serious and often discouraging antenna scenarios. In this video from Eric of "HamRadioConcepts", we see how a simple HF Loop Antenna mounted in your attic can get you on the air. The important thing to remember is "Never give up." Here are some comments from Eric: I went to my friends house to check out his setup and get him up and running on some HF digital modes. A lot of hams are struggling in an HOA with antennas outdoors. I have some plans to go back to his house with some new ideas for stealth outdoor antennas, and some more tests with other options in his attic. But for now, John has worked more DX stations on PSK31 and FT8 from his attic mounted antenna then a lot of other hams have all year. patreon.com/hamradio

Double Bazooka Antenna

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gfjEs2jYj8&ab_channel=Mark19960 This is post 2427 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Mark for this excellent step-by-step tutorial on how to build a Double Bazooka Antenna. The basic Double Bazooka Antenna is an efficient, broadbanded, and quiet single-band antenna that doesn't require a balun.  You can make the antenna with good quality RG-58 coaxial cable.  Multiband operation is possible with an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner"). For more detailed information on the Double Bazooka Antenna, please go here: hamuniverse.com/bazooka.html. ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

5 Great Multiband Wire Antennas.

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Five Great Multiband Wire Antennas. Views expressed in this antenna summary are those of the reporters and correspondents. Source:  https://www.dxzone.com/multiband-wire-antenna-projects/ This is post 2426 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Accessed on 21 November 2020, 2233 UTC. I ran across this article while pursuing some antenna research on "The DX Zone" web site. These home made HF antennas are simple, inexpensive, and often times "elegant." My favorites include the W5GI Mystery Antenna, the 6-Band Windom Antenna, and the H-Pole Vertical Antenna. Here are the top five wire antennas from the "DX Zone" website: Multiband Wire Antennas Wires antennas are since ever the more practical and cheapest aerials that hams can build. We selected five among the most interesting multiband  wire antennas  may provide inspiration for your own creativity. W5GI Mystery Antenna W5GI W5GI Mystery Antenna is a multi-band wire antenna that performs except

Simple Dual Band DX Vertical Antenna you can make

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lLGQNjQ4LVg&ab_channel=watersstanton This is post 2425 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Peter of "Waters & Stanton" in the UK for this perfect antenna project during the COVID-19 pandemic. With a little investment of time and a few locally bought materials, you can have a compact, efficient HF antenna covering the 20 and 15 meter Amateur Radio bands. Space requirements for this antenna are modest, so you can build the vertical in your back yard or garden. ----- Please stay safe during the upcoming holiday season.  Stay home and build some easy ham radio projects that will complement your station.  This antenna from Peter is an excellent choice for "stay-at-home" mandates. Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

6 Meter band Hentenna

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vjONoKY_dSc&ab_channel=vk5la This is post 2424 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Do you need a simple, efficient, and highly portable antenna for the 6 Meter Amateur Radio Band?  If the answer is yes, then this Japanese-designed "Hentenna" from VK5LA is for you. Here are some comments from VK5LA: Hi, I needed a quick and dirty 6 Meter antenna for portable and field day. Internet research came up with this...so I built it. The centre support mast is a 6 meter long collapsable "squid pole" fishing rod (only extended about half), and the spreaders top and bottom are 10mm wooden dowels. Imagine an 8 metre rectangle loop of wire (3+3+1+1 =8) suspended by the dowels and fed about .1 wavelength up from the bottom wire..viola!!! Try http://www.hamuniverse.com/hentenna.html ------ For more information, please click the link above (

Multiband Vertical Portable Antenna

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If you can't see the video, please click this title URL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2nh0Du58jg&ab_channel=OM0ET This is post 2423 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to OM0ET for this wonderfully simple, elegant, and effective multiband HF antenna. This antenna can be used at home and in the field. Here some general comments about this antenna: Hello! In this video I show you my homebrew multiband vertical portable antenna :) Me and Paul OM0WT went to try it in the field how will this antenna perform. We were impressed! We had many QSO's and two special - India! This vertical worked also with 100W without any problem :) All european QSO's we was made with 20-50W max. I plan to improve more my design and then show it again. I hope you enjoy this video! 73 and please subscribe if you like ;) #multibandverticalantenna #portableantenna #homemadeantenna ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

How to Build a Fan Dipole Amateur Radio Antenna

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UAlPQbf0SV0&ab_channel=DXCommander This is post 2422 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. If you want a simple, multiband HF antenna that doesn't require traps or an antenna "tuner", then the classic "Fan Dipole Antenna" may be what you need. Callum McCormick (the "DX Commander"- M0MCX) takes us step by step in making this basic, efficient HF antenna.  The antenna uses locally available materials and can be used both at home and on portable operations. Here are some general comments from Callum: I have built so many fan dipoles, I have now forgotten most of them! And I have never found the spacing between elements too critical either. Tune the longest one first (apparently) and it'll just work. Amazing fun. Balun Myths: https://youtu.be/q_Wn9c8HwcA Easy SWR: https://youtu.be/9GK0NAVltTE HEY! Subscribe he

Ham Radio-A 40 meter folded dipole using window line

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cS5nlutY_L4&ab_channel=KevinLoughin This is post 2421 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. If you want a bit more gain and bandwidth from your HF dipole, then try this 40 meter folded dipole design from Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW). Kevin takes us step by step through the design, construction, testing, and operation of this "classic" HF antenna. Here are some comments from Kevin: In all the years I've been playing radio, I've never built a folded dipole. Boy have I been missing out! These are amazing performers. Link to the 3D part for the center: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:361... My video on making the 4:1 Balun: https://youtu.be/l5rLI8FpM9g A few pages with technical info on folded dipoles: https://www.electronics-notes.com/art... https://www.w8ji.com/folded_dipole.htm https://www.qsl.net/w4sat/fdipole.htm If you

Building a Dipole Antenna Center Insulator

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fY8XaxamIYU&ab_channel=KB9VBRAntennas This is post 2420 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Michael Martens (KB9VBR) for this handy gadget which will support the center of your HF dipole through all kinds of weather.  Although commercially-made center dipole supports are available, you can build your own out of locally available materials for about $12 US. Here are some comments about the project, including estimated costs and a list of required materials. The dipole is a common antenna for the amateur radio operator; and with good reason- dipoles are easy to build and are proven performers. Recently I wanted to build a dipole but didn't have a center insulator. Instead of paying $25-45 and waiting days for delivery‚ I decided to build my own for about $12 using common parts (with the exception of the SO-239) and tools available a

Building a balcony vertical dipole VHF antenna

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFLprwd-L8k&ab_channel=RadioPrepper This is post 2419 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Sometimes, our antenna ideas just don't work.  In this video from the "RadioPrepper" youtube channel, we see how a great design often fails because of an unexpected environmental situation. This antenna was made to cover portions of the 6 meter amateur radio band, but failed to perform as designed.  The most likely suspect was the metal railing used to support the antenna. A wooden support (such as a chair) or some PVC pipe may have helped alleviate the issue. Here are some comment from the builder: Sometimes things don't work as planned. This antenna was supposed to work for the 6m FM band on 51.5MHz. It is actually a vertical dipole as a quarter wave antenna would have radials on the ground or at a 45deg angle for a 50 Ohm impedance. Di