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Showing posts from 2021

Old TV rabbit ears as a junk box 2 meter antenna

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdZeY-KihH8 This is post 2617 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. In this video from Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW), we see how an old TV rabbit ears can be used as a basic 2 meter antenna.   Here are some comments from Kevin: I love finding new uses for old tech. If you like my videos, please subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/user/loughkb?s... ​ If you want me to keep making more videos like this, consider becoming my patron at Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/kb9rlw/ ​ Discuss this and other videos on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kb9rlw/ ​ Hit me up on the echolink repeater down by my house: W9TE (Node: 519521) ----- Thanks for joining us today Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

Field Day Antenna Launching Demonstration

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCyyH0a_Cpk This is post 2616 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. With the next ARRL Field Day Event set for the last full weekend of June, many radio amateurs are considering simple, cost-effective antennas for this communications exercise. If your Field Day site is blessed with tall trees, then you have the perfect "natural mast" to support your portable antennas. The only remaining issue is finding a way to launch and secure your antenna wires safely. Thanks to the members of the Maple Newton Amateur Radio Club for this basic "compressed air cannon" which can place your wires at optimum heights for HF antennas. If the "air cannon" isn't feasible for your operation, you may try launching your wire antennas with a slingshot or bow and arrow.  Be sure you practice before Field Day begins. ----- Thanks for joining u

Chameleon CHA-RXL Stealth Receive Loop

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pYviUpqLeQY This is post 2615 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. If you live in a high-noise area, you may find the new Chameleon CHA-RXL Stealth Loop a way to stay on the air without losing your hearing. In this video from Josh Nass (KI6NAZ), we get an in-depth review of this sturdy and versatile receive-only loop antenna. Here are a few comments from Josh: Chameleon is releasing a new receive only loop, the CHA-RXL. Lets get it on the roof, test it out and talk about why receive loops can be pretty awesome. Loop can be found here: https://chameleonantenna.com/shop-her... ​ Support Ham Radio Crash Course Content Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/hoshnasi ​ (includes monthly newsletter, stickers and Patron perks) YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/HamRadioCra... ​ (includes early access to videos, membership YT badge and custom emojis) Shop

Parks On The Air (POTA) and Linked Dipole Antenna Build

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvtKlqQ6DSo This is post 2614 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Like it close cousin SOTA (Summits On The Air), POTA (Parks On The Air) continues to grow in popularity among radio amateurs. SOTA and POTA "expeditions" give radio amateurs a valuable lesson on how to operate during emergency or portable situations. In this video from Michael Martens (KB9VBR), we see how a portable field operation can be assembled in a short time. Please note the use of a "linked dipole antenna" for this POTA adventure.  This antenna is well-suited for both home and portable operations. Here are some comments from Michael: It was a good weekend to head north and build an antenna. For this Parks on the Air (POTA) Activation I'm at K-7260 which is the Northern Highlands American Legion State Forest. I'm building an 40/20 meter linked dipole

Cheap and Cheerful Ham Radio Field Day or POTA Antenna

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E_makoOL-m8 This is post 2613 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. The basic "Inverted V" is one of the simplest, most inexpensive antennas you can build for the upcoming ARRL Field Day or for your next portable operation. In this video from "SevenFortyOne", we get a step-by-step procedure for building a simple Inverted V Antenna from commonly available parts. This antenna is suitable for operations both at home and in the "field." Here are some comments from "SevenFortyOne": This portable Ham Radio antenna is something I put together from spare materials I had lying around the house one afternoon. It's a 40 meter inverted V made from a cheap WalMart cutting board, some left over 14 gauge wire, a 12 foot telescoping painter's pole, some scrap PVC trim board, and a few scrap pieces of re-bar. I plan t

Get ready for 2021 ARRL Field Day

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The annual ARRL Field Day is one of the largest communications exercises in the world.  The event is held on the last full weekend of June and attracts more than 40,000 radio amateurs from Canada and the USA, as they "go to the field" to practice and refine their emergency communications skills. Thanks to J. Mitch Hopper (K9ZXO) and his staff of volunteers for assembling this outstanding video describing the purpose of this "classic" Amateur Radio "contest" and emergency communications event. If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohZW7aCJDps Here are some general comments about the event. SUBSCRIBE http://www.arrl.org/field-day ​ | ARRL Field Day is amateur radio's open house. Every June, more than 40,000 radio amateurs (also known as 'ham radio' operators) throughout North America set up temporary transmitting stations in public places to demonstrate the capa

Outdoor Ham Radio-For those who want a quick and easy option

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNBz-fOykZg This is post 2611 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Peter of UK's Waters & Stanton Company for this easy and quick way to go mobile/portable using equipment you may already have in your ham shack. The arrangement isn't fancy or particularly efficient, but it does allow you to get on the air in a matter of minutes.  A good idea for both emergency use and informal field operations. Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

How to shunt feed your tower

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cHlc5MTGTFM This is post 2610 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Many radio amateurs shunt feed their towers as vertical antennas for the lower HF bands (160m-40m).   Although the procedure appears clear-cut, there are several factors that must be considered before you convert your tower to a vertical antenna. Thanks to Steve (VE6WZ) for offering a "fool-proof" method of shunt feeding towers for HF use. Here are some comments from Steve about the process: This shows the method for shunt feeding a tower. Using two different analyzers I show how to find the 50 Ohm point on the tower to achieve a 1:1 SWR match. Also explained is the effect of wire diameter on SWR bandwidth and reactance. Omega match video: https://youtu.be/NA-Kwr09j8M ​ ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

Magnetic Loop 40M-10M Built by 2E0ERO

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZFyjRBUMYo This is post 2609 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to 2E0ERO for this beautifully designed and built HF Magnetic Loop Antenna. The video show us how to build, test, and use this compact, "stealthy" antenna. Here are some comments from the "Tech Minds" youtube channel: Here we take a look at the principles of a transmitting magnetic loop and then test a magnetic loop built by 2E0ERO. Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/magloops ​ 2E0ERO Ordering Information 2e0ero@gmail.com If contacting Adrian, please make sure you mention Tech Minds. Join this channel to get access to perks: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9a8... ​ Products used in my videos can be purchased through my Amazon storefront. US ► https://www.amazon.com/shop/techminds ​ UK ► https://www.amazon.co.uk/shop/techminds ​ Suppor

Ham Radio: Base loaded coil testing on 80m and 160m

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDT8Aq5tmGI This is post 2609 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. If you operate on 80m and 160m from a small urban lot, you know how difficult that can be.  Most lots are just too small to accommodated a full-sized dipole or 1/4 wavelength vertical for these lower HF bands. However, Mike (M0MSN) has a solution:  Use loading coils to make these short antennas work on 80m and 160m. Here are some comments from Mike: The DX Commander or other 10 meter glassfibre pole, fitted with a Loading Coil. A 80M and 160M Vertical Antenna with a 11.15M driven element for the 40M band.. :) In this video I take a look at how it works and how to work out the value of the coil you need to build, to get the 40M element of the DX Commander to work on 1.8-9mHz (160M)..... A base loaded DX Commander for use on 40/80/160M bands, with the use of the 40M element that

The making of a link coupled antenna tuner

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If you can't see the video, please go here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nh4zWR1SQ3I This is post 2608 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Jaumais for this exquisite, homebrew balanced link antenna "tuner." Although I don't possess the tools or expertise to make this device, I was impressed by how beautiful and well-made the final product turned out to be. Thanks for joining us today. Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).  

Keeping Your Dipole Well Fed

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If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Lna5B91doA This post 2607 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. A good, basic discussion of how dipole antennas work and some of the misconceptions surrounding this "classic" HF antenna. Dave Casler (KE0OG) does an excellent job of showing us the advantages and disadvantages of using a variety of dipole antenna configurations. Here are some comment from Dave: Oggie Don Gardner, KC3RDV, has questions about feeding a dipole. He doesn't want the coax hanging down in the middle of the yard and is looking for options. We look at center-fed dipoles, off-center-fed dipoles, and end-fed dipoles. Subscribe: https://youtube.com/user/davecasler ​ . Ask Dave Playlist: https://goo.gl/inaQeB ​ . Tip Jar: http://ke0og.net/tip-jar ​ To learn more about me, visit: http://www.dcasler.com/about/ ​ Tip jar (on my website): http://www.dcasler.com/tip-j