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Salt water dummy load test 5kw

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6BAjHnZpVuc

This is post 2315 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

Do you need a dummy load for high-power testing? Try this experiment from "Lucky Dube in RC".  The main heat absorbing medium is salt water, not transformer or mineral oil.

Here's more information from the author:

"Testing my Home brew saltwater dummy load. High power dummy loads are expensive diy with a bit of water and a halve teaspoon of salt ! Dirt cheap!"

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Please be careful when you build and test this device.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).




Recent posts

Clearing up some confusion about end-fed wire antennas

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zF7bDoqkG4

This is post 2314 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

This is one of the best explanations of the theory and practice of end-fed antennas I've found on the internet--clear, concise, accurate. and no hype.

Here are some general comments from the "RadioPreppers.com" website:

Hoping to clear up some confusion on end-fed wires, half-wave or random and the impedance transformers used with them. You also get a free rant on contests and a quick glimpse of my new Elecraft K1. Check out the Half-Wave End-Fed antenna group on Facebook, by Steve Ellington. Formulas for half-wave wire calculations are 143/f in MHz for meters and 468/f for feet. Feedback would be appreciated especially to correct any mistakes I may have made in my analysis. Version Française en cours d'édition... EARCHI 9:1 UNUN: http://www.earchi.org/92011endfed…

Coax Feedline Pass Through

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tbh-IK7KIcg

This is post 2313 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

In this video, Pete Hadley (K6BFA) shows how different hams have passed antenna lines through glass windows without damaging the window or the feed line.

For a very simple solution to this problem, I recommend using a window pass through kit sold by MFJ Enterprises (model 4603). You can also find various homebrew pass through systems on the internet.  Please check out this topic from "Tinker Tom" (W5CYF) at https://w5cyf.wordpress.com.
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Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Ideas for compact 80m/160m antennas

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=th9bPEm9i9k

This is post 2312 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

In this video, Callum McCormick (M0MCX) discusses how to design, build, test, and use compact antennas for the 80/160 meter amateur radio bands.

Callum does a good job of describing his experimental linear loaded inverted L antenna--something which is easy to build and fits into an urban lot.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

How to build a three element beam antenna for 2 meters

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8RVqsdnKow

This is post 2311 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

Thanks to "Prepping Ohio" for this tutorial on how to build a simple 3-element 2 meter beam antenna. The antenna is vertically polarized, allowing for distant repeat contacts.  Most of the materials are available at the nearest hardware store or building supply outlet.  You may find many of the materials at your own home. The antenna is based on the "classic" Yagi-Uda design from the 1920s and 1930s.
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For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://hamradioupdate.com.
http://www.southgatearc.org.
https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com.
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://www.eham.net.
https://www.blubrry.com/arrlaudionews/
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How to splice a wire

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhzXRIj5FaY

This is post 2210 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

Thanks to Paul of "learningelectronics" for this simple, effective way to splice wire.  This splice is known by various names, including the "NASA Wire Splice."  

This splice will come in handy for those of us who design, build, and repair homemade antennas.  This splice is strong and holds up well in most environmental conditions.  Be sure to protect the splice against the weather.

Here are some of Paul's remarks:

Get professional PCBs for low prices from www.pcbway.com --~-- How to splice a wire In this video we look at how NASA splices wires. If it's good enough for the space program, it's good enough for me. NASA Standards: http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/codeq/d... 937D Soldering Station: http://amzn.to/2t3isiZ 22 AWG Hookup Wire: http://amzn.to/2oEn6h…

Making huge ground radial field

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Zqss03fcRc

This is post 2209 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

If you're using a vertical HF antenna, you know the importance of establishing a good ground radial or counterpoise system.

In this well-paced video from Callum (M0MCX), we see the ground radial project taken to its reasonable limit, with almost 405 meters/1,329 feet of wire prepared to insure an efficient radial field.
If you have lots of room and want to improve the performance of your HF vertical antenna, then this is the way to go.

Here are some general comments from Callum:

I used Arctic Grade DX10 for these radials for my eXtreme Nebula multi-band vertical currently in development. These 45 x 1/8th wave radials are equivalent to 22 x 1/4 radials for 80m; 5 x wavelengths - and a whopping 10 wavengths on 40m. Heck.. that'll give me 20 wavelengths of radials on 20m! And on the h…