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Showing posts from February, 2021

Ham Radio Survival Kit? Make an Antenna From almost any metal

If you faced a communications emergency, could you make a field expedient antenna from materials in your ham shack? In this video from Josh Nass (KI6NAZ), we see how a few simple parts can become the basic ingredients of a "Ham Radio Survival Kit."  This kit will help you get on the air quickly with a decent signal. If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3c19QJVG_r4 This is post 2537 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Here are some of Josh's comments: Can you turn just about any metal into an antenna? With this kit you might be able to. Contents of the kit can be found here: https://www.amazon.com/shop/hamradioc... ​ The fabulous Tukk 2 can be found here. https://tacticalkeychains.com ​ https://countycomm.com/products/titan... ​ HamTactical.com is LIVE! HRCC Merch Monthly newsletter, stickers, private content: https://www.patreon.com/hoshnasi ​ Links to product

Survival Antennas 1: The Coax only antenna.

If your antenna collapsed today, could you get back on the air with only the materials found in your home or ham shack? In this video from Brett of the "SurvivalComms" youtube channel, we see how a random length of coaxial cable, a multitool, and some rope/cordage can get you on the air in a relatively short time. If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlVGhNpY2oI This is post 2536 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Brett does an excellent job of providing an alternative antenna for the one lost to Nature or other circumstances. Here are some comment from Brett: First in a series of easy to build field expedient antennas that will save your bacon. Using a damaged hank of coax we build a simple antenna using just a multitool and cordage. Build skills , save money, have fun . For our metric system viewers : 1/2 wavelength formula 144/Fmhz = 1/2 wavelength in meters #survival

Field expedient VHF antenna

  If you can't see this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CwOATcwHrBo This post 2535 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to "SurvivalComms" for this emergency VHF antenna made from commonly available materials, including duct tape, wooden supports, and RG-6 coaxial cable. Make one for your home station and for your emergency "go kit." This design can be modified for television, 2 meter, and 70 cm use. Here are some general comments about this easily-made antenna: The field expedient antenna series continues. A VHF antenna out of RG6 TV coax. duct tape, and sticks. Down and dirty tech to put in the know-how tool box for when all else fails. ----- Thanks for joining us today. Aloh es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Link dipole vs 20m wire--which is better?

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browsers search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l1olzWsdBhE This is post 2534 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Australian radio amateur Peter Parker (VK3YE) for this informal comparison between a link dipole antenna and a 20m wire antenna. Here are his conclusions: A casual test, using WSPR, of two popularly used portable antennas. A link dipole covering 40, 30 & 20m versus an end-fed wire 20 metres long. I alternate between the two to see if there is a pattern in reception reports. The test is done in the middle of the day when conditions should be fairly stable. CORRECTION: There are errors on the 30m slide. The numbers are right but the conclusions are not. The dipole was mostly worse not better. If you want to buy a commercially-made link dipole for 20 & 40m, consider this one. http://ebay.us/ALytRE ​ (Note: I receive a commission on sales - at no extra charge to y

End fed halfwave antenna sloper vs flat horizontal orientation

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgEtQOS8mY0 This is post 2533 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. According to Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW), you can learn a lot about antennas with some simple experiments. In this video, Kevin compares the performance of an end fed halfwave sloper antenna with a conventional flat horizontal dipole antenna. Each antenna has its advantages, depending on the space available, ground conditions, deed restrictions, and local interference levels. Here are some comments from Kevin: I'm not an antenna expert, I'm just sharing my observations and my own speculation. Learning more about the end fed half wave antenna with an experiment. If you like my videos, please subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/user/loughkb?s... ​ If you want me to keep making more videos like this, consider becoming my patron at Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/kb9rlw/ ​

The Inflatable AntennaAir on 20 meters

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9eZa3NIdQM This is post 2532 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. In this video, Josh Nass (KI6NAZ) tests "The Inflatable AntennaAir" on 20 meters. The antenna is self-contained, highly portable, and can be used both at home and in the field. An interesting, innovative antenna idea! Here are some comments from Josh: This is an all-in-one unit. No radials needed. Just inflate the antenna, hang or mount it and get on the air. These are only available from the inventor, https://twitter.com/AntennaAir ​ Monthly newsletter, stickers, private content: https://www.patreon.com/hoshnasi ​ Links to products in the video: https://www.amazon.com/shop/hamradioc... ​ As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Current Shack Config: ICOM 7300: https://amzn.to/2sVdpOq ​ ICOM 2730a: https://amzn.to/2JqrASg ​ MFJ-4230DMP: http://www

Deploying a J-Pole Antenna to a tree

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browsers search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUxZc42Z9uQ This is post 2531 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Trees make excellent support for a variety of HF/VHF/UHF antennas.  The trick is to get the antenna high enough without snarling the wire and feed line. In this video from "biblesnbarbells", we see the easiest way to launch a J-Pole antenna into the upper branches of a tree.   Although a rock is handy, I prefer something a bit more accurate--such as a slingshot or a bow and arrow. Here are some comments from the video: In this video I demonstrate how to deploy your J-Pole Antenna using a tree branch as a base. I used 25 feet of high viz paracord, tied one end to a rock. I tossed the rock ofer the tree branch and tied off the remaining paracord on the base of the tree. Next I removed the rock and tied the other loose end of the paracord through the antenna and hoisted up

Multiband Vertical Portable Antenna

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2nh0Du58jg This is post 2530 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Here's another great antenna idea for portable or field operations--a homemade multiband HF vertical antenna. OM0ET and OM0WT do an excellent job of designing, building, and testing this easily-made antenna. Here are some general comments from OM0ET: Hello! In this video I show you my homebrew multiband vertical portable antenna :) Me and Paul OM0WT went to try it in the field how will this antenna perform. We were impressed! We had many QSO's and two special - India! This vertical worked also with 100W without any problem :) All european QSO's we was made with 20-50W max. I plan to improve more my design and then show it again. I hope you enjoy this video! 73 and please subscribe if you like ;) #multibandverticalantenna ​ #portableantenna ​ #homemadeantenna ----- Tha

3D printed multiband vertical antenna loading coil

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-jBY1lX0aCg This is post 2529 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to "SA2CLC" for this fascinating and oftentimes inspiring tutorial on how to make an antenna loading coil. The key to this project is some plastic and a 3D printer, which makes the coil easy to build. Here are some comments from "SQ2CLC": Here is montage of me making a loading coil for vertical antennas from scratch using the Ender 3 3d printer. The coil form is printed in PETG at high resultion. I have desgned the coil using fusion 360, with inspiration from an OK1CDJ design if I remember correctly. I set up the antenna using a 6m fishing rod, 2 radials, each 5m long. The radiator was cut to give good SWR at 20m with shorted coil, and then 30, 40 and also 60m could be matched using the coil. Thanks for watching. .stl at thingiverse: https://www.thingiv

Ideas for compact 80m/160m antennas

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=th9bPEm9i9k This is post 2528 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Operating the 80 meter or 160 meter amateur radio bands from a small urban lot presents a difficult challenge to most radio amateurs. In this video, Callum (M0MCX) discusses several ways to get on those bands without losing too much antenna efficiency.   According to Callum, linear loading can help you operate on the lower HF bands without much trouble. Here are some of Callum's comments: Inverted Ls do work for these low bands but what if you don't even have that amount of space? Perhaps linear loading an inverted L might do the trick, although the bandwidth might be tight - and the impedance might not be perfect either. Anyway, we'll see. HEY! Subscribe here: https://goo.gl/thM5Vq ​ My Shop: https://www.m0mcx.co.uk/store/products/ ​ Enjoy your science folks. Good

W9BVX's Helium Balloon Vertical Antenna

If you can't find a suitable antenna support for your next portable or field operation, try this solution from W9BVX and the Wisconsin Valley Amateur Radio Club. If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVXJB-k8co0 This is post 2527 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Here's some more information about this intriguing antenna: At the young age of 9, Bob W9BVX, visited an ARRL Field Day site with his dad and saw the most amazing thing; an HF antenna lifted into the air by a helium balloon. Ever since that day, his life's dream was to do the same thing. Watch now as he ticks another item off his 'bucket list'. Thank you to the Wisconsin Valley Radio Association for assistance with this project: Http://www.wvraclub.org ​ . Support Ham Radio Q & A! Shop Amazon: http://amzn.to/29Nj1mP ----- Video courtesy of Michael Martens (KB9VBR). Thanks for joining us today. Aloha

HAM RADIO: Building a magnetic loop antenna, part 2

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kJzh1_alk4 This is post 2526 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. In this video, Mike (M0MSN) completes his magnetic loop antenna.  He lists the components and materials needed for the project and shows us how all the parts fit together.  He finishes the build with some testing and completes a contact once the antenna is in place. Overall, this project is an example of excellent design, construction, and documentation.  Here are a few comments from Mike: So much to do, the construction of a Mag Loop.. Its all been none stop over the past month or two... let me know in the comments below what you want to see me build and I will try to do it. :) This upload is all about building a MagLoop (Magnetic Loop Antenna) its been a long time in the making but has proven to be worth the wait. this is part 2 of a 2 part upload, in this part I will list all th

HAM RADIO: Building a magnetic loop antenna

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fdxFgb8a9A This is post 2525 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Mike (M0MSN) for this outstanding two-part series on building a magnetic loop antenna. In part one, we go through the design and construction phase of this antenna.  In part two, we get a full list of materials and tools needed for the project. A well-done and detailed approach to magnetic loop antennas. Here are some of Mike's comments: So much to do, the construction of a Mag Loop.. Its all been none stop over the past month or two... let me know in the comments below what you want to see me build and I will try to do it. :) This upload is all about building a MagLoop (Magnetic Loop Antenna) its been a long time in the making but has proven to be worth the wait. this is part 1 of a 2 part upload, in the second part I will list all the parts and measurements you will