Skip to main content

ARRL abandons congressional efforts to pass the Amateur Radio Parity Act. Post 1753

ARRL drops efforts to pass the Amateur Radio Parity Act.

Accessed on 25 January 2019, 0304 UTC, Post 1753.

Source:  http://www.arrl.org/arrlletter?issue=2019-01-21.

Editor:  Rick Lindquist (WW1ME).

As the old saying goes:  "Close, but no cigar."  The ARRL Board of Directors has decided to abandon legislative efforts to save the "Amateur Radio Parity Act".  The legislative package was aimed at relieving some of the antenna restrictions found in deed-restricted properties (HOAs and CC&Rs).  Over the past few years, the "Amateur Radio Parity Act" has come close to passage, but was stopped cold when the U.S. Congress rejected the measure.

Rather than try another congressional battle, the ARRL has decided to appeal directly to the FCC (Federal Communications Commission) for antenna relief.

Here's the official position of the ARRL from the 24 January 2019 issue of "The ARRL Letter":

"ARRL Board of Directors Issues Statement on Amateur Radio Parity Act
At its annual meeting January 18 - 19, the ARRL Board of Directors decided that the organization needs to "review, re-examine, and reappraise ARRL's regulatory and legislative policy with regard to private land use restrictions."
In order to effectively undertake such a review, the Board adopted a resolution to withdraw its December 18 Petition for Rule Making to the FCC, which sought to amend the Part 97 Amateur Service rules to incorporate the provisions of the Amateur Radio Parity Act (ARPA), without prejudice to refiling. The resolution also is asking members of Congress who had refiled legislation to enact the Amateur Radio Parity Act (ARPA) to refrain from seeking to advance that legislation pending further input from ARRL.
Board members noted that ARRL has been pursuing adoption of the ARPA for the past several years, and that objective has not yet been achieved. While everyone understands that getting Congressional approval on any matter can be a lengthy process, the difficulties getting the ARPA approved has been a source of frustration to the organization and its members. A majority of the Board now believes that there is a need to reassess the organization's approach to this issue.
The Board wants to make clear to its members, and to those whose policies and conduct prevent or impair the right of US Amateur Radio operators to operate from their homes, that this pause is not, and should not be interpreted as an abandonment of its efforts to obtain relief from private land-use restrictions. The Board noted that its intent is "to renew, continue and strengthen the ARRL's effort to achieve relief from such restrictions." This action represents a chance to get the best product possible for all US Amateur Radio operators.
The Board expressed its sincere appreciation to the thousands of ARRL members who took the time to contact their representatives in Congress to urge them to support the Amateur Radio Parity Act. The Board also offered its thanks to those members of Congress who have consistently and continuously supported the rights of US Amateur Radio operators."
--------------------------------
Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

G5RV Multi Band HF Dipole Antenna. Post #1555.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeNHIQ_j4Dk

This well-produced and richly illustrated tutorial on the classic G5RV HF Dipole Antenna was presented to the Brandon Amateur Radio Society in Brandon, Florida in 2017 by Bernie Huth (W4BGH).  Bernie does an excellent job of  explaining the pros and cons of this popular HF antenna from the late Louis Varney (G5RV).  Although Varney envisioned his design primarily as a 3/2 wavelength antenna for the 20 meter Amateur Radio band, radio amateurs have used the antenna for multiband use.  The G5RV is an excellent choice for the 20 meter band.  Performance on other HF Amateur Radio bands is good enough to qualify as stand alone HF antenna if you can only erect one HF antenna.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podca…

Amateur Radio Bicycle Mobile Setup. Post #1554.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zWb-KnkGdY.

Here's a way to use Amatuer/Ham Radio while you work on shedding a few pounds in useful exercise.  Why not equip your bicycle for 2 meter/70 cm mobile operation?

In this short, well-made video, "taverned" shows us how he used a mag mount antenna, a simple C clamp, and a basic ground system to convert his mountain bike into a mobile station.  The project is straight forward, simple, and gives you emergency communications while you peddle down the road.

For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites:

http://www.HawaiiARRL.info.
http://www.arrl.org.
http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon).
https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com.
https://bigislandarrlnews.com.
https://amateurradionewsinformation.com (Amateur Radio News & Information).
https://www.eha…

An 80-Meter Vertical Helix

Like many amateur radio operators, I live on a small lot surrounded by neighbors, utility lines, and civic-minded citizens concerned about the "attractiveness" of my community.  Whether by design or outright fear, I've adopted the "stealth" approach to ham radio antennas.  It's the old "out of sight, out of mind" idea applied to amateur radio antennas.

The amateur radio press is full of articles describing the struggle of amateur radio operators to pursue their hobby under the burdensome regulations of CC & Rs, HOAs, and other civic minded citizens who object to antenna farms.  So far, my modest verticals, loops, and inverted vees have blended well with the vegetation and trees bordering my small backyard.  Vertical antennas have always been a problem because of the limited space for a radial system.  There are times, however, where a shortened vertical for the lower HF bands (such as 80/75 meters) is necessary where horizontal space is lacki…