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QRZ Seeking Experienced Web Programmer. Post #367.

QRZ Seeking Experienced Web Programmer: " QRZ Seeking Experienced Web Programmer
QRZ is looking for a skilled, experienced web programmer to join our team and become a part of ham radio history. QRZ is an internet-based virtual company and so this is an opportunity for a work-at-home position. It doesn't matter where you live so long as you have a great internet connection and can interact with other team members who are on the Mountain Standard Time schedule. This is a salaried, full time position that offers competitive pay, benefits, vacation as well as sick leave. You are free to move about the country and connect in from exotic places while you work. Like I said, it doesn't matter where you are located, or even if you're mobile, so long as you are able to login, work, make deadlines, and have frequent interaction with the rest of the team on Skype.

QRZ's technical infrastructure is cloud-based using industry standard LAMP practices. You'll need experience in both back-end server programming as well as HTML5, javascript, AJAX and a knowledge of modern browser quirks and conventions. Some of the technical skills required for this position include: LAMP programming with the 'P' to include Perl as well as PHP, strong MySQL database skills, and Linux command line skills, to name a few. vBulletin and WordPress familiarity are a plus. Terminal editing skills (such as vi or vim) are required. A deep knowledge of HTML and the DOM are absolutely necessary. As a programmer, you'll be using Javascript, including jQuery, Perl, PHP, and shell scripting.

You also need experience in ham radio. In addition to programming, you will be helping our team support tens of thousands of hams who will be using your work product. Feedback will be instantaneous and your personal gratification will be huge, as will your sense of responsibility towards our 500,000 registered members from around the world. You will need great written communications skills as well as the ability to cheerfully support individual users when problems arise.

Applicants should send their resumes along with an introductory email to: jobs@qrz.com You should include links to websites and/or pages that you've either designed or played a significant role in integrating or developing. The salary offered will depend on your experience.

Not qualified but know someone who is? You can earn a referral bonus if the person you send us gets the job!


Update - Just to clarify: 1) the applicant must be a licensed ham, and 2) the applicant must be proficient in the Perl programming language.
Last edited by AA7BQ; Today at 12:26 AM.
Fred Lloyd, AA7BQ
Publisher, QRZ.COM
aa7bq@qrz.com
"--------------------------------------------------
Please forgive the  inclusion of a non-antenna item in this post.  The opportunity to work for QRZ.com sounds like a win-win for an experienced amateur radio operator with superior web programming skills.  You can work from home, receive a competitive salary, and get immediate feedback from an engaged amateur radio community.  If you're interested in this position, email your resume to:  jobs@qrz.com.  Good luck!

For the latest Amateur Radio news and events, please check out the blog sidebars. These news feeds are update daily.

You can follow our blog community with a free email subscription or by tapping into the blog RSS feed.  You can find more amateur radio headlines at my news site:  http://kh6jrm.com.

Thanks for joining us today!

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).



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