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ARRL National Centennial Convention 2014 - FEMA Administrator Craig Fuga...

This is post #298. Fugate spoke before some 800 guests at the Friday evening ARRL Centennial Convention banquet in Hartford, Connecticut. Earlier that day, he and ARRL President Kay Craigie (N3KN), signed a memorandum of Agreement (MOA) aimed at enhancing cooperation between the ARRL and FEMA in the area of disaster communication. In his remarks at the banquet, Fugate said that before he even became FEMA administrator, it became clear to him that Amateur Radio could support ad hoc and innovative communication without relying on conventional telecommunications systems. In his remarks, Fugate noted that "The more sophisticated our systems become, the more fragile they become...the relevancy of ham radio only grows...Amateur Radio is taking that hobby and turning it into saving lives." Earlier, Fugate upgraded to the General Class Amateur Radio License. After Fugate's talk, President Craigie presented him with the ARRL Medal of Honor. Aloha de Russ (KH6JRM).

Simple Ham Radio Antennas. Improvised Field Day Antennas. Post #283.

The 2014 ARRL Field Day is just about history as more than 35,000 amateur radio operators transmitting from 2,500 emergency sites finish the last action-packed hours in this annual communications exercise designed to test communications capabilities during man-made or natural disasters. I always enjoy Field Day activity, whether I spend a few hours operating, logging contacts, or even taking down the rapidly assembled antennas used for this part training exercise and part contest. Over the past few years, I've used some impressive rigs ( Elecraft K3) and neatly fashioned antennas, both commercial and homemade.   This year was no exception.  As usual, I put in a few hours working for my former radio station at a "Moku O Hawaii " outrigger canoe regatta on Hilo Bay before I slipped briefly over to the Field Day site of the Big Island Amateur Radio Club at the Wailoa Visitor Center in Hilo.  I'm on a retainer to work various remote broadcasts and a few sportin

Simple Ham Radio Antennas: Time to head for the radio basement? Post #270

Those of you who follow my Amateur Radio News Blog (http://kh6jrm.com) on a regular basis may be aware of two related radio stories that will have a significant impact on the future of amateur radio and the rf spectrum that we share with other services. The first article relates to comments made by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler at the annual NAB convention today in Las Vegas, Nevada. In his speech before NAB delegates, Wheeler urged television broadcasters to abandon over-the-air transmissions in favor of streaming over the internet.  Wheeler says the migration to broadband internet would free up spectrum for the ever increasing demands of consumer electronics, from cell phones and iPads to mobile radio and other public services.  Already, VHF analog channels between channels 2 and 13 have moved to higher frequencies and now employ digital signals.  The now vacant channels won't remain idle for long, since these VHF allocations will be assigned to other services. The gradual appro

Simple Antennas for the Amateur Radio Operator--a continuing series

PURPOSE OF THIS SITE Over the past few days, some of my readers have asked why I put this site together and to whom  the information is directed.  These are fair questions, since my interest in Amateur Radio (Ham Radio) may be far from your concerns. I have two reasons for writing this blog: 1.  The blog serves as a personal journal about my journey through interpersonal communications and my love for all things electronic.  I've been a licensed amateur radio operator for 35 years.  I've enjoyed every moment of the experience, from building equipment to designing my own antennas (the things that launch signals into the atmosphere).  I was fortunate to have had a good electronics background courtesy of the United States Air Force and over 40 years in the commercial broadcast business.  Very early in my radio journey, I helped design and build the student FM radio station at the University of Hawaii (Manoa), worked at various radio stations, and even put a part 15 (unlicen

Simple Antennas for Amateur Radio Operators--a continuing series

The ARRL's annual Field Day communications exercise is coming 23 June 2012.  Field Day is one of the largest operating events in the United States and Canada.  Whether you operate from a multi-station position or run emergency power from your home, Field Day will test your creativity, endurance, and ability to withstand the forces of nature for at least one day. Since I'm commited to announcer duties for that weekend at the Hilo Drag Strip, my participation will be limited.  I plan to run class 1-C mobile from the Drag Strip using my emergency kit stashed in the Odyssey van.  While I camp overnight at the race track, I will set up the Yaesu FT-7, a few hamsticks on a mag mount with several radials, and a deep cycle marine service battery for several hours during the event.  This should be a good test under field conditions. If the first day of racing finishes early, I most likely will meet members of the Big Island Amateur Radio Club at Hilo's Wailoa Community Center f