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Showing posts with the label Testing a bi-square antenna on 10 metres.

Testing a bi-square antenna on 10 metres. Post #1625.

If you can't views the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKNE25ZNgu4. Australian radio amateur Peter Parker (VK3YE) has produced an interesting video about the bi-square antenna--one of the few antennas I've never tried.  According to Peter, the construction of this antenna is simple:  Take two 10 meter (approximately 33-feet) of wire, "form into a square with the ends at the top and bottom.  Support at the top and tie off to maintain a square diamond shape.  Connect to transceiver via (an) antenna coupler that can handle high impedances...the support should be 7-8 metres (23 to 26-feet) high."  Peter believes the antenna can deliver around 3-4 dB gain with a figure 8 pattern broadside to the wires. For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites: http://www.HawaiiARRLinfo. http://www.arrl.org. http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is up

Testing a bi-square antenna on 10 metres. Post #1277.

If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser inbox: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKNE25Ngu4. Here's another very good, simple antenna that costs little while delivering great performance on the band of your choice.  In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) shows us how to build a bi-square antenna for the 10 meter amateur radio band. Construction is easy--form a square with the ends at the top and bottom. Support the top with a telescoping fiberglass mast ("squid pole").  Connect the bi-square to a simple homebrewed L "tuner" and run a piece of coax to your rig--in this case a Yaesu-817 QRP transceiver.  Since the SWR could be high, you may want to used balanced feed line into the "tuner".  As you can see from the video, Peter did get some contacts.  This is a fun antenna that won't cost you much money. If you're ambitious, build one of these antennas for 40, 20, or 15 meters. For the latest Amateur Rad

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Testing a bi-square antenna on 10 metres. Post #836.

If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKNE25ZNgu4.  One of these days, you may want to try a simple bi-square antenna for 10 meters. This antenna is simple, portable, and cheap.  In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) shows us how to build a simple bi-square antenna for the 10 meter amateur radio band.  If you follow his simple instructions, you should have a working antenna is a short period of time.  The construction is fairly easy:  Take two ten-meter pieces of wire and form them into a square with the ends at the top and bottom. Support is at the top of a small mast.  Tie off the sides to maintain a square or diamond shape.  Connect your feed line through an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner" or coupler) and check for SWR.  In this video, Peter was able to contact several stations using his QRP rig--a Yaesu FT-817. Good luck! For the latest Amateur Radio news and informat

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Testing a bi-square antenna on 10 metres. Post #656.

If you're having difficulty viewing this video, please insert this address into your browser search box: https://youtu.be/xKNE25ZNgu4. Peter (VK3YE) has come up with another simple, yet effective gain antenna for portable operations.  In this video, Peter shows us how to build a bi-square antenna for the 10 meter amateur radio band.  The antenna is quite simple.  Take two ten meter/32.8-feet pieces of wire; form them into a square; support the top with a fiberglass mast; and tie off the sides to maintain a diamond shape.  Peter use a homebrew L-match to connect the bi-square to his HF transceiver.  You could also connect some 450 ohm ladder line to bottom of the bi-square and run this line into a 4:1 current balun.  A short length of 50 ohm coaxial cable will connect the balun to your antenna transmatch ("tuner").  This design can also be modified for use on the 20 and 15 meter bands.  This is an excellent 10 meter antenna, which will give you some gain without costing