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Showing posts with the label Ham Radio-Ground spike antenna. Using the earth to receive LF and VLF.

Ham Radio-Ground Spike Antenna. Using the earth to receive LF and VLF. Post #1468.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHK7kKsVVw0. Here's an interesting, unconventional antenna that could open an entire new world of radio listening.  In this video from Kevin Loughin (KB9RLW), we learn how to use what Kevin calls a "Ground Spike Antenna" to tap directly into the earth for LF and VLF signals.  Now that radio amateurs in the U.S. and elsewhere are able to transmit in the 630 and 2200 meter bands, antennas such as the "Ground Spike" could help you explore the largely untapped universe below the standard AM broadcast band.  Kevin does an excellent job of showing just how easy it is to tap LF and VLF signals by using the earth as a key antenna element.  Build one of these antennas and prepare for some unusual listening, courtesy of the earth itself. For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites: http://www.HawaiiARR

Ham Radio - Ground spike antenna. Using the earth to receive LF and VLF. Post #1234.

If you can't view this video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jHK7kKsVVw0. One of the most fascinating portions of the electromagnetic spectrum lies in the area below 300 kHz--the realm of Low Frequency (LF) and Very Low Frequency (VLF).  The "basement" of the RF spectrum contains all kinds of interesting signals, from military communications (for submarines, mostly) and time signals to atmospheric noise and the sounds of the Earth itself.  Now that radio amateurs are allowed to explore some of this spectrum (630 meters and 2200 meters), you may want to build an antenna to familiarize yourself with the phenomena present way below the standard broadcast band. In this video, Kevin Loughin shows you an antenna called a "ground spike" that can be used to monitor these very low frequencies.  The antenna is simple, inexpensive, and fun to use. For the latest Amateur Radio news and information, please