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Showing posts with the label American Radio Relay League

Simple Ham Radio Antennas. Improvised Field Day Antennas. Post #283.

The 2014 ARRL Field Day is just about history as more than 35,000 amateur radio operators transmitting from 2,500 emergency sites finish the last action-packed hours in this annual communications exercise designed to test communications capabilities during man-made or natural disasters. I always enjoy Field Day activity, whether I spend a few hours operating, logging contacts, or even taking down the rapidly assembled antennas used for this part training exercise and part contest. Over the past few years, I've used some impressive rigs ( Elecraft K3) and neatly fashioned antennas, both commercial and homemade.   This year was no exception.  As usual, I put in a few hours working for my former radio station at a "Moku O Hawaii " outrigger canoe regatta on Hilo Bay before I slipped briefly over to the Field Day site of the Big Island Amateur Radio Club at the Wailoa Visitor Center in Hilo.  I'm on a retainer to work various remote broadcasts and a few sportin

Hawaii County Mayor declares Amateur Radio Week in Hawaii County. Post #281.S

Source:   Hawaii Tribune-Herald , 14 June 2014. Reporter:  Bob Schneider (AH6J), ARRL Pacific Section Manager. In tribute to Hawaii Island hams who provide emergency communications for Hawaii County during times of natural or man-made disasters, Hawaii County Mayor Billy Kenoi has declared 23-29 June 2014 as "Amateur Radio Week" in Hawaii County.  Mayor Kenoi has urged the public to support the American Radio Relay League 's (ARRL) Field Day events set for Saturday, 28 June 2014, when amateur radio club members will set up and demonstrate emergency communications equipment and skills. In Hilo , the public is invited to activities hosted by the Big Island Amateur Radio Club (BIARC) from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Walmart.  A Field Day station will be operational from 8 a.m. Saturday until 8 a.m. Sunday at the Wailoa Visitor Center in Hilo.  During that 24-hour period, local ham operators will contact other amateur radio operators across the Pacific and North America.

Simple Ham Radio Antennas: Time to head for the radio basement? Post #270

Those of you who follow my Amateur Radio News Blog (http://kh6jrm.com) on a regular basis may be aware of two related radio stories that will have a significant impact on the future of amateur radio and the rf spectrum that we share with other services. The first article relates to comments made by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler at the annual NAB convention today in Las Vegas, Nevada. In his speech before NAB delegates, Wheeler urged television broadcasters to abandon over-the-air transmissions in favor of streaming over the internet.  Wheeler says the migration to broadband internet would free up spectrum for the ever increasing demands of consumer electronics, from cell phones and iPads to mobile radio and other public services.  Already, VHF analog channels between channels 2 and 13 have moved to higher frequencies and now employ digital signals.  The now vacant channels won't remain idle for long, since these VHF allocations will be assigned to other services. The gradual appro

Basic DX tips. Post #260

One of my favorite pursuits in amateur radio is chasing DX (distance) contacts with hams living or visiting in remote places of the world, be they small nations, islands, or even mountain tops.  Each contact is a small adventure to a place I may never see. For the dedicated contester or DX enthusiast, there are many attractive awards (i.e. DXCC , WAS, WAC, etc.) to pursue. I'm more of a "casual" DXer , squeezing in contacts when house building or part-time teaching permit.  For those moments when I'm free of family responsibilities, I enjoy listening and working exotic, far off places.  Since I live on Hawaii Island , I'm often the "target" of DXers...a task I thoroughly enjoy. During my 37 years as an amateur radio operator, I've experienced both the joy of making a rare contact and the frustration of losing some elusive call in a rush of QRM.  Such is the DX experience. There must be an easier way of making DX contacts than wading through a