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Showing posts with the label Adding 80 metres to a 40 metre dipole.

Adding 80 metres to a 40 metre dipole. Post 1815.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kXRz6fPFKY. If you live on a small urban lot, erecting a full-sized 80 meter dipole antenna will present a difficult challenge.  According to Australian ham Peter Parker (VK3YE), a simple 40 meter dipole antenna can be modified to work at 3.5 MHz (80 meters) by adding end-loading coils.  Although the "transformed" antenna won't be as efficient as a full-length 80 meter dipole, it will get you on the air with a somewhat narrower bandwidth.  Peter's adaptation comes from an original design by VK5AH. For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites: http://www.HawaiiARRL.info. http://www.arrl.org. http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon). https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com. https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com. https://bigislandarrlnews.com. https://

Adding 80 metres to a 40 metre dipole. Post #1490.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v-4kRz6fPFKY. Here's an easy, inexpensive way to add the 80 meter amateur radio band to your existing 40 meter dipole antenna.  With the solar cycle heading towards the bottom, lower HF frequencies, such as 80 and 160 meters, become dependable, viable bands for radio amateurs. In this video, Peter Parker (VK3YE) uses end loading coils to make a 7 MHz dipole operate on 3.5 MHz.  If you're willing to sacrifice some efficiency and bandwidth, this antenna modification will get you on the air quickly from your home QTH. Here are some observations from Peter regarding overall design and construction suggestions for this antenna transformation: "A 7 MHz dipole made to operate on 3.5 MHz by adding end loading coils. It won't be as efficient as a full sized 80m dipole and the bandwidth will be narrow. However it will get you on the air from a s

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--Adding 80 metres to a 40 metre dipole

If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this title link into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4kXz6fPFKY. This is post #995 in a continuing series called "Simple Ham Radio Antennas." Now that propagation is favoring the lower HF Amateur Radio Bands (160-40 meters), it may be a good idea to redesign your 40 meter dipole antenna to accommodate the 80 meter (3.5 MHz) band.  If you live on a small urban lot, extending your 40 meter (7 MHz) dipole antenna may present some challenges. In this video from Peter Parker (VK3YE), we learn how to use a 7 MHz dipole antenna on 3.5 MHz by adding end-loading coils.  Although this modification won't be as effective as a full-length 80 meter dipole and will be a bit narrower in bandwidth, it will get you on the air.  You may also use the 40 meter part of this modified antenna to work stations on the 15 meter (21 MHz) band, since the 40 meter elements will be usable as a 3/2 dipole on 1