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Showing posts with the label 40 Meter Inverted V Antenna-Build

40 Meter Inverted V Antenna - Build, Tune

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7za6gPWcNng. This is post 2084 in a continuing series on simple ham radio antennas. Thanks to Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ) for this excellent tutorial on designing, building, tuning and testing a basic Inverted V Antenna. Inverted V antennas are excellent performers if you have limited space for a full half- wave horizontal dipole antenna.  In Dave's example, the end of each antenna segment is 11 feet/3.35 meters above ground, allowing sufficient space for people and animals to pass through without injury. A few years ago, I built a variation of this antenna fed with 450 ohm ladder line.  That antenna covered 40 through 10 meters with the help of an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner").  Without a tuner, the antenna will cover part of the 15 meter band, using the third harmonic of 7 MHz. The video is well-organized and easy to follow, especially if

40 Meter Inverted V Antenna - Build, Tune & Test! Post 2037.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-vpRMQWanw. Here's a simple way to build, tune, and test an inverted V antenna that covers the 40-20-15-10-6 meter Amateur Radio bands. In this video, Greg Alexander creates an interesting inverted V/Fan Dipole combination that uses mostly locally available materials.  Only a single feedline is need for this antenna.  Greg lays out the construction procedure very well and all parts should go together without major issues. ---------------------------------------- For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites: http://www.HawaiiARRL.info. http://www.arrl.org. http://www.blubrry.com/arrlaudionews/ https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com. https://hamradiohawaii.wordpress.com. https://bigislandarrlnews.com. https://www.eham.net. http://www.hamradioupdate.com. http://www.southgatearc.org. Thanks for joining us tod

40 Meter Inverted V Antenna - Build, Tune & Test! Post 1952.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-vpRMQWanw. In this video from Greg Alexander, we see the complete design, construction, tuning, and testing sequence involved in making an inverted V "Fan Dipole Antenna." According to Greg, this homebrew multiband HF antenna covers the 40, 20, 15, 10, and 6 meter amateur radio bands.  If you build your fan dipole/inverted V with care, you won't need an antenna transmatch (i.e. "tuner") to solve high SWR issues. Greg does an excellent job of showing us the materials and techniques used to build this simple, easily supported (only one tall support is needed) HF antenna. For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites: http://www.HawaiiARRL.info. http://www.arrl.org. http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon). https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.

40 Meter Inverted V Antenna - Build, Tune & Test! Post 1906.

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbq1UgwM_go. A nicely done video tutorial from Barbara Justice and her children on how to build, tune, and test a multiband inverted Vee Antenna.  According to Ms. Justice, this inverted Vee dipole is built like a fan dipole and is capable of working the 40, 20. 15, 10, and 6 meter amateur radio bands. The instructions are clear and the assembly is fairly easy.  It was good to see her children involved in making this simple, effective antenna.  Perhaps, the "younger set" will pursue their own amateur/ham radio licenses in the future. For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites: http://www.HawaiiARRL.info. http://www.arrl.org. http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which is updated each Friday afternoon). https://bigislandarrlnews.com. https://oahuarrlnews.wordpress.com. https://hamradio

40 Meter Inverted V Antenna-Build, Tune & Test. Post #1479.

If you can't view the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbq1UgwM_go. What started out as a "snow day" project for Barbara Justice and her children ended up as a 40 meter/20 meter fan dipole configured as an inverted V antenna.  Barbara says a few modifications also allowed her to use the antenna on 40-20-15-10 and 6 meters.  Despite the antennas low height above ground, the overall results of this winter activity produced a useful, multiband HF antenna at a modest cost. The video takes you-step-by-step through the building, configuration, and use of this versatile antenna.  The assembly process is organized, efficient, and simple.  Just follow the instructions and you'll have an efficient multiband HF antenna in just a few hours. For the latest Amateur/Ham Radio news and information, please visit these websites: http://www.arrl.org. http://www.arrl.org/arrl-audio-news (a weekly podcast which

Simple Ham Radio Antennas--40 Meter Inverted V Antenna - Build, Tune & Test! Post #570.

If you're having trouble viewing this video, please insert this URL into you browser search box: https://youtu.be/7za6gPWcNng. Another great antenna tutorial from Dave Tadlock (KG0ZZ).  In this video, Dave shows you how to design, build, and erect a 40 meter inverted v dipole antenna .  Most of the materials for this antenna can be found at the nearest hardware or home improvement store .  The inverted v gives a good account of itself and only uses one support to get the antenna above ground.  For multi-band use (40 through 10 meters), replace the coax feed line with 450 ohm ladder line or 300 ohm television twin lead.  Take this feed line and attach it to a 4:1 balun . Run a short length of 50 ohm coaxial cable from the balun to your antenna transmatch (i.e. tuner).  If you prefer using coaxial cable, the 40 meter inverted v dipole antenna can be used on its third harmonic to give coverage of the 15 meter ham band.  The SWR may be a bit high on 15 meters, so an antenna t