How to set up a Home-based Field Day Station

If you can't see the video, please insert this title URL into your browser search box:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MeumSDLXBKM.  This is post 2216 in a continuing series of simple ham radio antennas.

Because of restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, many radio amateurs in the USA will be operating from their homes.  If you've never done a "mini dx-pedition" from your backyard, this video from Tracy ("Outdoors On The Air") will help you get started.

Because of various work requirements, I've been a backyard operator for years.  Using solar power, a simple HF transceiver, and a homebrew antenna, I've enjoyed all the benefits of a portable operation without leaving my property.  I admit to missing my radio club friends at the nearest county park, but, when you've been ordered to "stay-at-home" until the coronavirus is contained, a home operation is better than no participation at all.  You can still have a lot of fun as a class 1-E station (emergency power) despite the absence of a larger club station.

Here are some of Tracy's observations to get you started:

"Can't get out into the "real field" for ham radio Field Day? Maybe you should mount an expedition into your backyard. I'll show how I used to do it. I hope this is an encouragement to those who cannot get out to the field for themselves, but still want a taste of the experience. I ended up with a total of 135 contacts across 40, 20 and 15 meters. Footage was shot in 2014."

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Please stay safe during this difficult time. Try to have a little fun with your stay-at-home Field Day Station.

Thanks for joining us today.

Aloha es 73 de Russ (KH6JRM).


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